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Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) is a revolutionary technology, with point-to-point DWDM systems representing the first phase in the evolution of Optical Transport Networking. DWDM is the most cost-effective way to expand capacity than some other alternatives such as adding fibre or replacing current capacity systems. Laying new fibre is expensive, particularly for long routes, and its installation can take too long to satisfy customers. TDM technology is no longer able to keep pace with the emerging ultra-broadband data backbone demands.

• 32 channel with 100 Ghz spacing. • Support for long haul (22 dB Span attenuation) and ultra-long haul (28 dB Span attenuation) point-to-point applications. • Integrated optical multiplexing and pre emphasis. • In-line/In-service monitoring of individual optical channels (Wavelengths). • Monitoring and alarm generation for B1 errors. • Add/Drop channels up to a maximum of four channels in both directions. • Omni orderwire. • Client Side Interface: STM 1/4/16, Gigabit Ethernet. • 10 Mbps Ethernet Interface for EMS. • Out of Band Forward Error Correction. • Elaborate alarm reporting. • Topologies supported: Point-to-Point and Linear. • Easy upgradation from In-Line Amplifier to Optical Add-Drop Multiplexer. • A user-friendly Local Management Interface (LMI) for Operation, Administration and Maintenance  • Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) based Element Management System. • CORBA compliant North Bound Interface. • Remote maintenance and supervision via optical supervisory channel. • Standard 19” construction practice: 32 channels in two racks of 2750mm height. • Common engineering practices for all TE, ILA and OADM (ETSI standard).

• Number of Optical Channels 32 • Channel Spacing 100Ghz • Wavelength AsPerITU-TG694.1 • Path Attenuation/Number of Spans 22dB,28dB/8,5 • Total Optical Output Power(Max.) +17/+18dBm • Maximum Number of Wavelengths for ADD / DROP at OADM 4 • Optical Supervisory Channel Wavelength 1510+/-10nm • Supervisory Channel bit-rate 2.048 Mbps • Interface with SDH Terminals As per ITU-T G.957 • EMS/LCT Interface 10 Base T/RS 232 • Power Supply Input Voltage Range -40 VDC to - 60 VDC • DWDM Rack Size 2750 mm

• Dense vegetation and hilly terrain • Emergency situations • Urban areas with high WiFi penetration • Long tunnels, highways • Battlefield surveillance

• 32 channel with 100 Ghz spacing. • Support for long haul (22 dB Span attenuation) and ultra-long haul (28 dB Span attenuation) point-to-point applications. • Integrated optical multiplexing and pre emphasis. • In-line/In-service monitoring of individual optical channels (Wavelengths). • Monitoring and alarm generation for B1 errors. • Add/Drop channels up to a maximum of four channels in both directions. • Omni orderwire. • Client Side Interface: STM 1/4/16, Gigabit Ethernet. • 10 Mbps Ethernet Interface for EMS. • Out of Band Forward Error Correction. • Elaborate alarm reporting. • Topologies supported: Point-to-Point and Linear. • Easy upgradation from In-Line Amplifier to Optical Add-Drop Multiplexer. • A user-friendly Local Management Interface (LMI) for Operation, Administration and Maintenance  • Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) based Element Management System. • CORBA compliant North Bound Interface. • Remote maintenance and supervision via optical supervisory channel. • Standard 19” construction practice: 32 channels in two racks of 2750mm height. • Common engineering practices for all TE, ILA and OADM (ETSI standard).

• Number of Optical Channels 32 • Channel Spacing 100Ghz • Wavelength AsPerITU-TG694.1 • Path Attenuation/Number of Spans 22dB,28dB/8,5 • Total Optical Output Power(Max.) +17/+18dBm • Maximum Number of Wavelengths for ADD / DROP at OADM 4 • Optical Supervisory Channel Wavelength 1510+/-10nm • Supervisory Channel bit-rate 2.048 Mbps • Interface with SDH Terminals As per ITU-T G.957 • EMS/LCT Interface 10 Base T/RS 232 • Power Supply Input Voltage Range -40 VDC to - 60 VDC • DWDM Rack Size 2750 mm

• Dense vegetation and hilly terrain • Emergency situations • Urban areas with high WiFi penetration • Long tunnels, highways • Battlefield surveillance